100 YEARS’ ANNIVERSARY 1909-2009 TEL AVIV

Tel Aviv, the first modern Hebrew city, was founded on April 11, 1909. On that day, several dozen families gathered on the sand dunes on the beach outside Yafo to allocate plots of land for a new neighborhood they called Ahuzat Bayit, later known as Tel Aviv. The city expanded rapidly with massive waves of immigration in the 1920s and 30s, also bringing about a boon in Bauhaus-style architecture.

Tel Aviv’s status as the region’s most creative, liberal and tolerant city received was furthered when Yafo joined the municipality in 1949.

Throughout the decades, the city has flourished to become Israel’s business and cultural center and has developed a unique atmosphere fusing Mediterranean and urban elements.

“One hundred years later, the vision of our city’s founders – who looked at the sand dunes and saw the potential for a vibrant city – has been realized,” says Mayor Ron Huldai. “Tel Aviv-Yafo is a thriving global city that 400,000 resi-
dents are proud to call home.”

THE WHITE CITY OF TEL AVIV

In July, 2003, UNESCO, the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, proclaimed ” The Whi- te City”, the unique urban and historical fabric of Tel Aviv- Jaffa, a World Cultural Heritage site. By this proclamation, the world recognized the special architectural qualities of the buildings, streets, squares and avenues of Tel Aviv.

Tel Aviv

"Bruno House, Tel Aviv © Yigal Gawze" Fragments of a Style – International style Architecture in Tel Aviv

Tel Aviv, the first Hebrew city in modern times, was foun- ded in 1909 and was built on the sand dunes north of the ancient port city of Jaffa. Its style was innovative, tailored to the needs of its residents, to their life styles and the climatic conditions of the region. “The White City”, the world’s largest grouping of buildings in the International Style, also known as Bauhaus, was planned by the famous Scot, Sir Patrick Geddes. About 4,000 buildings were constructed in this area, beginning in the 1930’s until the establishment of the State of The “White City” is located between Allenby Street in the south, Begin Road and Ibn Gvirol Street in the east, the Yarkon River in the north, and the Mediterranean Sea in the west.

The buildings of “The White City” were designed by Jewish architects, who had studied in Europe before their immigration to Palestine, which later became the State of Israel. This group created a new architectural language, which is rich and diverse, characterized by its asymmetry, functionality and simplicity. The balconies, building pillars, flat roofs and “thermometer” windows became the trade marks of the city.

“The White City” is the story of Tel Aviv, from its beginning to today and is a wonderful opportunity to savor the experience of life in Tel Aviv, in the past and the present.


The Herta and Paul Amir Building

TEL AVIV ART MUSEUM

The Herta and Paul Amir Building, a six-level building was designed by American architect PRESTON SCOTT COHEN known for his inventive use of light and geometric forms. This new 195,000 sq. feet building will double the exhibition space of the Tel Aviv Art Museum. The Herta and Paul Amir Building is slated for completion in 2009 in conjunction with the 100th anniversary of Tel Aviv’s founding.

Established in 1932, the Tel Aviv Museum of Art has grown to become an international cultural center with an extensive series of exhibitions yearly of Israeli and international art, architecture, and design as well as permanent and loan collections spanning the major movements in international Modern art, Israeli art from the 1920s on, and a selection of 16th through 19th century art.

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